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Goat's Cheese & Ricotta Pansoti with Chive Butter and Walnut-Thyme Pangrattato (v.)

A classic pasta from Liguria— the rocky coastline better known as the Italian Riviera and, of course, not forgetting the home region of our founder — pansoti derive their name from the rather unflattering yet endearing pancia. Italian for "belly", the snugly nestled filling within the exterior layer of pasta is suggestive of one too many nights of gluttonous overindulgence, hard to abstain from when dealing with this kind of soft filled pleasure. Earliest mention of their existence dates back to 1931, making them a fairly recent addition to the cosmic variety of Italian pastas in culinary circulation.

Our selection sees it paired with a rich, creamy goat’s cheese and ricotta, making the temptation to resist all the harder. Whilst goat’s cheese is often divisive, with detractors invoking its intensity, both ricotta and chives add freshness and depth to the flavour profile. Traditionally, the walnut would have come in the form of a sauce or pesto, a dish typical of the cucina genovese. Here, we’ve done things a bit differently. Whilst still preserving the crunch of the walnut, we’ve added it to our pangrattato, along with thyme. Sprinkle and toss these little gems through the pansoti just to top it all off.

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A classic pasta from Liguria— the rocky coastline better known as the Italian Riviera and, of course, not forgetting the home region of our founder — pansoti derive their name from the rather unflattering yet endearing pancia. Italian for "belly", the snugly nestled filling within the exterior layer of pasta is suggestive of one too many nights of gluttonous overindulgence, hard to abstain from when dealing with this kind of soft filled pleasure. Earliest mention of their existence dates back to 1931, making them a fairly recent addition to the cosmic variety of Italian pastas in culinary circulation.

Our selection sees it paired with a rich, creamy goat’s cheese and ricotta, making the temptation to resist all the harder. Whilst goat’s cheese is often divisive, with detractors invoking its intensity, both ricotta and chives add freshness and depth to the flavour profile. Traditionally, the walnut would have come in the form of a sauce or pesto, a dish typical of the cucina genovese. Here, we’ve done things a bit differently. Whilst still preserving the crunch of the walnut, we’ve added it to our pangrattato, along with thyme. Sprinkle and toss these little gems through the pansoti just to top it all off.

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