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Roman Bucatini all'Amatriciana & Pecorino (gf. avail)

Pork was the most popular meat of Ancient Rome, and was widely enjoyed throughout society as well as by the Roman legions, propelled into battle and glory alike through their expansive and unusually sumptuous diet. Indeed, pork featured widely in the writings of Rome's most prominent cooks, including Apicius, whose De Re Coquinaria includes a recipe for a sweet pork ragù, including figs, mint, dill, honey and even apricots.

However, as the influence and power of Rome waned, so lost the people of Rome their taste for the sweeter things. Instead, Romans turned to curing their pork, experimenting with altogether saltier flavours. Guanciale (pork cheek) became a favourite, and is frequently included in amatriciana sauces. Here, however, we substitute pancetta for a deeper, smokier flavour. We cook our pancetta with tomatoes, white wine, and top with pecorino romano cheese. And whilst the ancient Romans might have prescribed an anointing of honey, we think you'll appreciate that we've left this out, in recognition that, like ancient Rome itself, some tastes are better left behind.

INGREDIENTS (allergens in bold): Fresh pasta (Wheat flour, Egg, Durum wheat flour, Salt), Tomatoes, Pancetta (bacon), White wine, Black pepper, Chilli flakes

GARNISH INGREDIENTS: Pecorino Cheese

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Roman Bucatini all'Amatricina & Pecorino

Grams Calories
Roman Bucatini 160g 410kCal
Amatriciana Sauce 155g 250kCal
Pecorino 10g 25kCal

 Please note the above nutritional guidance is based on our estimates only. 

Story

Pork was the most popular meat of Ancient Rome, and was widely enjoyed throughout society as well as by the Roman legions, propelled into battle and glory alike through their expansive and unusually sumptuous diet. Indeed, pork featured widely in the writings of Rome's most prominent cooks, including Apicius, whose De Re Coquinaria includes a recipe for a sweet pork ragù, including figs, mint, dill, honey and even apricots.

However, as the influence and power of Rome waned, so lost the people of Rome their taste for the sweeter things. Instead, Romans turned to curing their pork, experimenting with altogether saltier flavours. Guanciale (pork cheek) became a favourite, and is frequently included in amatriciana sauces. Here, however, we substitute pancetta for a deeper, smokier flavour. We cook our pancetta with tomatoes, white wine, and top with pecorino romano cheese. And whilst the ancient Romans might have prescribed an anointing of honey, we think you'll appreciate that we've left this out, in recognition that, like ancient Rome itself, some tastes are better left behind.

Ingredients

INGREDIENTS (allergens in bold): Fresh pasta (Wheat flour, Egg, Durum wheat flour, Salt), Tomatoes, Pancetta (bacon), White wine, Black pepper, Chilli flakes

GARNISH INGREDIENTS: Pecorino Cheese

Recipe Card

Find it here. 

Nutrition

Roman Bucatini all'Amatricina & Pecorino

Grams Calories
Roman Bucatini 160g 410kCal
Amatriciana Sauce 155g 250kCal
Pecorino 10g 25kCal

 Please note the above nutritional guidance is based on our estimates only.