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Artichoke-Filled Gnocchi with Burro e Salvia & Pine Nuts (v.)

What could be more Italian and primaverile (spring-seasonal) than hand-made gnocchi filled with beautiful artichokes? And whilst spring lies ahead of us, this dish evokes the very best of the Italian countryside in spring.

Artichokes are called scacioffa in Pugliese; interestingly, in the north of Italy they are known by “articiòch” or “articiocca”, reminiscent of the English, where they grow abundantly both in the autumn and spring months.

There are references that point to the first artichokes being grown in the south of Italy from 300 BC. Artichokes are thought to have arrived in the UK in the 16th century, i.e. 1,800 years later… clearly, they were a secret worth keeping.

Served with simple but indulgent burro e salvia (butter and sage), as well as crunchy pine nuts, this dish heralds the nearness of spring. Take comfort in knowing that warmer days lie ahead.

Story

What could be more Italian and primaverile (spring-seasonal) than hand-made gnocchi filled with beautiful artichokes? And whilst spring lies ahead of us, this dish evokes the very best of the Italian countryside in spring.

Artichokes are called scacioffa in Pugliese; interestingly, in the north of Italy they are known by “articiòch” or “articiocca”, reminiscent of the English, where they grow abundantly both in the autumn and spring months.

There are references that point to the first artichokes being grown in the south of Italy from 300 BC. Artichokes are thought to have arrived in the UK in the 16th century, i.e. 1,800 years later… clearly, they were a secret worth keeping.

Served with simple but indulgent burro e salvia (butter and sage), as well as crunchy pine nuts, this dish heralds the nearness of spring. Take comfort in knowing that warmer days lie ahead.

Ingredients